Tag Archives: Stayin’ Alive

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

35 of the most iconic movie songs of all time

Mister D: Honestly, if we are being fair, “The Rose” should have made this list, too. But good job Brinkwire! Brinkwire 35 of the most iconic movie songs of all time June 19, 2018 by Brinkwire Bette Midler, Barbara Hershey, Dyed Hair, Beaches “Footloose” by Kenny Loggins (“Footloose”) The movie musical quickly became one of the biggest hits when it was released in 1984, in no small part thanks to Loggins’ now-iconic song. It’s impossible not to dance when you hear it, which is probably why the song topped the charts for three weeks in a row on the US Billboard Hot 100, becoming such a massive hit that Loggins himself was blown away by its success. In 2014, he revealed in an interview, “It became the biggest movie of the summer. We didn’t see it coming. But I remember going to the premiere and watching the opening scene of the movie, … using “Footloose” (the song) over the dancing feet. My wife turns to me and goes, ‘This is gonna be huge.’” Audiences furiously kicked off their Sunday shoes in agreement, of course. “Kiss From a Rose” by Seal (“Batman Forever”) Seal originally released the song in 1994, but it hit icon status when it was featured on the “Batman Forever” soundtrack a year later, earning the singer three Grammy Awards for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Male Pop Vocal Performance. It might feel like an unlikely song for a superhero movie, but that’s what makes it work so perfectly. “Kiss From a Rose” is no doubt Seal’s biggest hit, cementing Val Kilmer’s Batman as one of the most memorable of all. “I Will Always Love You” by Whitney Houston (“The Bodyguard”) Houston was already a bona fide music legend by the time she made her acting debut in the 1992 romantic thriller, but the song rapidly became one of her most remarkable hits, thanks to those searing high notes and her flawless delivery. It’s often forgotten that the ballad is actually a cover of a Dolly Parton song, and it made music history as the only country song to reach No. 1 in three separate decades. It topped the charts around the globe upon its release and did the same within hours of Houston’s death in 2012. “Lady Marmalade” by Christina Aguilera, Pink, Lil Kim, Mya, and Missy Elliott (“Moulin Rouge!”) With its suggestive chorus and a medley of high notes from the biggest pop stars of the early aughts, “Lady Marmalade” had new life breathed into it when Aguilera, Lil Kim, Mya, Pink, and Elliott covered it for Baz Luhrmann’s whimsical romantic musical in 2001. Few likely expected it to become such an iconic soundtrack song, but you’d be hard-pressed to find a karaoke bar or wedding reception where the song isn’t playing. It’s fun, it’s campy, and it brought together a group of powerhouse pop stars in a way that happens all too rarely, topping the Billboard charts for nine consecutive weeks, the only all-female collaboration to do so. “Happy” by Pharrell Williams (“Despicable Me 2”) If you have kids, know kids, or have ever met a kid, you’ve definitely sung along to “Happy,” which was first featured on Williams’ album “Girl” before becoming a massive global hit thanks to a feature spot on the animated film’s soundtrack. “Happy” became the biggest-selling song of 2014, and even years later, it’s impossible to go anywhere without hearing the infectious anthem. So when you do, be sure to “clap along if you feel like a room without a roof” … we’re not entirely sure what it all means, but we’re, ahem, to comply. “Stayin’ Alive” by The Bee Gees (“Saturday Night Fever”) It takes a rare film and song to define an entire era, but “Stayin’ Alive,” which served as the iconic opening scene to the 1977 coming of age tale starring John Travolta did just that, becoming one of the most classic disco songs of all time. The film’s soundtrack featured a slew of hits by the group of brothers and other disco acts, but “Stayin’ Alive” is the one that inspired a generation to strut down the street in their best disco duds.

“Over the Rainbow” by Judy Garland (“The Wizard Of Oz”) ...  Read More

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